Community

Community Grant Initiative

Community collaborations are valued and important to Treatment Assessment Screening Center (TASC). Throughout the year, staff volunteer their time and resources to support activities that benefit partners and the people and families they serve. Now, TASC is proudly expanding its community outreach with the launch of its new Community Grant Initiative.

The TASC Community Grant Initiative awards grants to nonprofit organizations working in the field of substance abuse and serving Arizona families. This innovative approach develops collaborations with organizations that have the program infrastructure and personnel experience in place so that grant funds are utilized effectively and efficiently while avoiding duplication of effort. The Community Grant Initiative supports TASC’s mission to provide “behavioral health services, substance abuse treatment, education and supportive services.”

TASC’s Community Grant Initiative Committee is responsible for overseeing the initiative. Based on substance use trends, research, and feedback from local and national leaders, the Committee is currently focusing its grants on substance abuse prevention and early intervention.

Drug and alcohol use start at an early age in Arizona. 13 years is the average age of first time drug use according to the Arizona Youth Survey. Drug use at such a young age places our children at great risk for addiction and mental health issues because their bodies and brains are still developing. The prefrontal cortex of the brain responsible for judgment is not fully developed until our mid-20s. According to the Treatment Research Institute’s “Paving the Way to Change” report:

  • Youth are 5 times more likely to develop a substance use disorder compared to adults. This disease can (and frequently does) follow them for life.
  • More than 90% of adults suffering from addiction developed the problem between the ages of 12-20 years.

More information about TASC’s Community Grant Initiative is provided below.
For additional information please contact Leslie Bloom at TASC.

Community Grant Initiative Committee Members

Front Row, Left to Right:
Ilene Dode, PhD
CEO Emeritus, Empact

Edward Hernandez
Maricopa County Community College District

Back Row, Left to Right:
Leslie Mihata Bloom
Director, TASC Community Grant Initiative

Jane Wabnik
Business & Public Issues Consulting

Ellen Kirschbaum
Chair, Arizona Board of Executive Clemency

  • Collaborations
    • TASC’s Community Grant Initiative Committee awarded grants totaling $428,875 to the following organizations in inaugural year 2016:

      Arizona Youth Partnership, Kingman, $68,500 for evidence-based 6th grade student and parent education and formation of three youth-led coalitions.
      Contact: Trish Ford

      Empact Suicide Prevention Center, $61,000 for evidence-based education targeted to pre-teens and teens primarily in Tempe, Chandler, Mesa, Laveen, Gilbert, and Guadalupe.
      Contact: Sandra McNally

      ICAN, Chandler, $66,000 for evidence-based in school and after school classes educating youth in grades K-12 in Chandler.
      Contact: Cassie Patris-Browne

      MATFORCE, Prescott, $60,000 for evidence-based programs targeting K-5th grade students and their parents in Prescott and Cottonwood.
      Contact: Merilee Fowler

      Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, $39,120 for development of “Preventing and Getting Help for Opioid Abuse and Addiction,” a research-based community education and awareness program to benefit the entire state of Arizona.
      Contact: Kevin Collins

      Pima Prevention Partnership, Tucson, $73,161 for “Teen Court Plus” that integrates best practice behavioral health screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) into the Pima County Teen Court diversion program for youth who have pled guilty to misdemeanor offenses.
      Contact: Adelita Grijalva

      Scottsdale Prevention Institute, $61,094 for model and evidence based educational trainings and workshops for youth, parents and families.
      Contact: MaryEllen Tinsley or Marybeth Madden

  • What is the Initiative’s Focus?
    • The current focus is substance abuse prevention and early intervention because drug and alcohol use starts at an early age in Arizona. 13 years is the average age of first time drug use according to the Arizona Youth Survey. Drug use at such a young age places our children at great risk for addiction because their bodies and brains are still developing. The prefrontal cortex of the brain responsible for judgment is not fully developed until our mid-20s. According to the Treatment Research Institute’s “Paving the Way to Change” report:

      • -Youth are 5 times more likely to develop a substance use disorder compared to adults.
        This disease can (and frequently does) follow them for life.
      • -More than 90% of adults suffering from addiction developed the problem between the ages of 12-20 years.
  • What is the source of funds?
    • TASC’s board of directors annually allocates funding to the Community Grant Initiative. Allocations may vary from year to year.

  • Who determines the grant awards?
    • The TASC Community Grant Initiative committee is an advisory committee to TASC’s board of directors. The committee oversees the grant process including eligibility, funding priorities, and the monitoring of grant applicants. Committee members have extensive experience in the substance abuse, criminal justice, and education fields. With limited funds and focus on substance abuse, the committee is strategically identifying community partners for grants. Therefore, the application process is by invitation only. Awards for the inaugural year are expected in 2016.